pages 10-12


   Goddamnit. I swear, I can read about his drug use and illegal activities and be relatively unaffected (again, you don't wind up in prison for saving puppies), but interactions like the one I typed out today tear me up. For those of you who aren't following his book, today's pages were describing an interaction with a bank teller the day he got out of prison. He was trying to cash a state issued check given to him by the correctional facility, and only had his prison ID. Obviously, the teller was surprised, and Alex embarrassed. I can only imagine how many of these seemingly small, yet massively demoralizing interactions he and other former inmates had and have on a daily basis. How terrible to be constantly reminded of your mistakes like that. Can you imagine what life would be like if you had to present an ID that put all of your mistakes out in the open? Maybe yours hasn't landed you in the prison system, but there are lots of awful things people do that aren't illegal. Perhaps we should start including all of our faults on our driver's licenses, under our weight and eye color.

Bad father
Drinks too much
Tells best friend's secrets
Cheats on spouse
Neglects the dog
Lies about everything
Takes things out on family
Threw a coworker under the bus

Mine would probably look like this:

Lora Conrad
02/09/1985
hair color: brown
eye color: brown
anger management and anxiety issues
threw a computer once
covers feelings with jokes
organ donor



1 comment:

  1. I love your writing. And his. Thanks for sharing all of this, Lora.

    ReplyDelete

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pages 79-81

   Sometimes I ask myself what Alex ever did for me to justify the amount of time and emotional energy being spent on editing this asshole&...